1991 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


Cards issued in 1991 worth $5 or more:

Donruss inserted 5,000 autographed Ryne Sandberg cards and 7,500 Nolan Ryan cards in 1991.

1991 Bowman #569 Chipper Jones RC  6.00
1991 Donruss Elite #1 Barry Bonds  60.00
1991 Donruss Elite #2 George Brett  40.00
1991 Donruss Elite #3 Jose Canseco  25.00
1991 Donruss Elite #4 Andre Dawson  15.00
1991 Donruss Elite #5 Doug Drabek  10.00
1991 Donruss Elite #6 Cecil Fielder  10.00
1991 Donruss Elite #7 Rickey Henderson  25.00
1991 Donruss Elite #8 Matt Williams  10.00
1991 Donruss Elite #L1 Nolan Ryan LGD /7500  65.00
1991 Donruss Elite autographed Ryne Sandberg  100.00
1991 Score Mickey Mantle #1 The Rookie  9.00
1991 Topps #333 Chipper Jones RC  6.00
1991 Topps Traded #4 Jeff Bagwell RC  3.00
1991 Ultra Update #58 Ivan Rodriguez RC  6.00
1991 Ultra Update #79 Jeff Bagwell RC  6.00
1991 Upper Deck #55 Chipper Jones RC  6.00

Alta Loma Premiums – 1995

by card hog


Collector score: **** (4  Stars)

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition

Alta Loma were made for just one year, 1995.  Dimensions are  2.5  x  3.5  inches.
The last known tobacco cards ever issued, one card was found in each retail package of 4 hand-rolled cigars, sold under the brand name “Alta Loma Premiums” during that year.  The company operated during the 1990s in Tampa, Florida.

The cards are thick and sturdy, printed on pasteboard with monochrome fronts and spot color on the backs.

Alta Lomas are all serial-numbered, and only 50 of each card was created.  This makes assembling a set of them an impossible feat.  At this time, there is no known checklist available.  We are hoping perhaps some of our readers will have more information so a checklist can be eventually compiled.  The absence of a complete checklist is the only reason this set does not get a 5 star collector rating.

The subjects are baseball players, actresses, boxers, football players, and other famous personalities.  Known cards are: Ty Cobb, Floyd Patterson, Rick Casares, Al Lopez, Babe Ruth, Pete Rose, Willie Mays, Carole Lombard, Brooks Robinson, and Paul Hornung.

In the case of the two Alta Loma cards which I have actually handled, the aroma of the cigars can still be faintly detected.  While I consider this to be a plus, some collectors of tobacco cards actually hate the smell of tobacco, even in small doses.

With only 50 of each card in existence, and considering that these are probably the last tobacco cards which will ever be issued, the value is at a premium.  In near-mint condition, they should retail for a minimum of $20 and up.

The cards have a nice feel to them, using cardboard similar to that used in the early 1950s Topps cards.

The boxes of Alta Loma Premium cigars these came in are worth $30-40 unopened and intact.

(CARDHOG)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1990 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


Cards issued in 1990 worth $5 or more:

Frank's name is missing. This rare variation is worth $800

1990 Leaf #21 Nolan Ryan $6.00
1990 Leaf #91 Barry Bonds $5.00
1990 Leaf #197 Cal Ripken Jr. $6.00
1990 Leaf #220 Sammy Sosa RC  $12.00
1990 Leaf #300 Frank Thomas RC $15.00
1990 Leaf #325 Larry Walker RC  $5.00
1990 Topps #414 Frank Thomas (error card – no name on front) RC  $800.00
1990 Upper Deck #17 Sammy Sosa RC  $5.00

1989 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


Cards issued in 1989 worth $5 or more:

1989 Bowman #220 Ken Griffey Jr. RC    $6.00

1989 Donruss #3 Ken Griffey Jr. RC   $5.00

1989 Fleer #548 Ken Griffey Jr. RC  $5.00

1989 Score #100 Ken Griffey Jr. RC  $5.00

1989 Topps Traded #41T Ken Griffey Jr. RC  $6.00

1989 Upper Deck #1 Ken Griffey Jr. RC   $50.00

1989 Upper Deck #25 Randy Johnson RC   $15.00

1988 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


No major brand cards issued in 1988 are worth 5 bucks.

 Even after over 25 years, they are essentially worthless because so many were printed.

ACEO Cards

by card hog


Collector score: *** (2  Stars)

ACEO stands for Art Card Originals and Editions. It is a term that was coined by an eBay seller in 2004 to describe little works of art which are exactly the size of a standard baseball card, 2.5 x 3.5 inches.

The only true ACEO cards which have any value are the “one of a kind” variety, created using paint, colored pencils, or anything except a giclee (inkjet) print.  A “giclee ACEO” is worthless, because it can be reproduced by anyone, and can never be a unique work of art.  If such a print is artist-signed, it is worth whatever the value of the artist’s autograph is, and no more.

Hammerin' Henry Aaron - ACEO sketch card

True ACEO cards can be worth significantly more, depending on the artist.  It is worth pointing out that most ACEO cards are worth very little, for the same reasons that most full-size paintings have little value. Unless the artist is famous, their work is not going to be worth much.

You can never collect a “complete set” of ACEO cards, since each one is supposed to be unique.

Caveat Emptor:  Many artists create a larger number of ACEO “sketch” cards, with only slight variations, then list each one as a “one of a kind” or “1 of 1″ creation.   Technically, they are correct, but the fact that numerous versions of the same image are sold dilutes any value pretty quickly.  Think about it: What would the Mona Lisa be worth if Leonardo Da Vinci had painted 200 of them, each slightly different? The value would be significantly lower!  The Hank Aaron card above might be available with an “A” (Atlanta) on the cap, with shorter sleeves, various bat lengths, various colors of piping on the uniform, different colored background, etc. – there might be hundreds of “1/1″ Hammerin’ Henrys sold as one-of-a-kind original works of art.  It is in fact a standard practice among many who sell these kind of cards.  For that matter, painters sometimes do the same with paintings, but the practice seriously erodes the value.

When all is said and done, ACEOs are probably not for the average card collector – they are for art collectors.  However, if you can own a piece of original art of a player you collect for 5-10 bucks, where is the harm?

PRICING: If you own one or more of these cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.

1987 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


These cards, issued in 1987, are valued at $5 or more:

DONRUSS:

#36 Greg Maddux RC  $10.00

#46 Mark McGwire  $5.00

#361 Barry Bonds  $8.00

 

 

DONRUSS ROOKIES:

#1 Mark McGwire  $6.00

 

FLEER:

#504 Barry Bonds  $25.00

 

FLEER UPDATE:

#68 Greg Maddux  RC  $8.00

 

TOPPS:

#320 Barry Bonds  $8.00

 

 

 

1986 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


These cards, issued in 1986, are valued at $5 or more:

DONRUSS:

#39 Jose Canseco RC  $8.00

 

DONRUSS ROOKIES:

#11 Barry Bonds  $25.00

 

FLEER:

#649 Jose Canseco RC  $6.00

 

FLEER UPDATE:

#14 Barry Bonds RC  $20.00

#20 Jose Canseco   $5.00

 

SPORTFLICS ROOKIES:

#13  Barry Bonds  $15.00

 

TOPPS TRADED:

#11T  Barry Bonds RC  $25.00

#20T Jose Canseco RC  $5.00

 

 

 

1985 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


These cards, issued in 1985, are valued at $5 or more:

1985 Topps #401 Mark McGwire Rookie Card

DONRUSS:

#14  Cal Ripken Jr.  $6.00

#60  Nolan Ryan  $8.00

#169  Cal Ripken Jr.  $6.00

#254  Pete Rose  $8.00

#273  Roger Clemens  $20.00

#438  Kirby Puckett  $5.00

#581  Orel Hershiser RC  $5.00

#641  Pete Rose  $6.00

 

FLEER:

#155  Roger Clemens  $25.00

#286  Kirby Puckett  $6.00

#359  Nolan Ryan  $5.00

 

TOPPS:

#181  Roger Clemens  $25.00

#401  Mark McGwire RC  $20.00

#536  Kirby Puckett  $10.00

#600  Pete Rose  $5.00

#760  Nolan Ryan  $5.00

 

1984 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


These cards, issued in 1984, are valued at $5 or more:

DONRUSS:

#8  Johnny Bench & Carl Yastrzemski  $5.00

#41  Joe Carter RC  $8.00

#53  George Brett  $5.00

#57  Reggie Jackson  $6.00

#60  Nolan Ryan  $10.00

#61  Pete Rose  $10.00

#106  Cal Ripken Jr.  $8.00

#151  Wade Boggs  $5.00

#183  Mike Schmidt  $8.00

#248  Don Mattingly RC  $25.00

#311  Ryne Sandberg  $5.00

#324  Tony Gwynn  $5.00

 

FLEER:

#131  Don Mattingly RC  $20.00

 

FLEER UPDATE:

#27  Roger Clemens RC  $160.00

#43  Dwight Gooden RC  $8.00

#80  Joe Morgan  $6.00

#93 Kirby Puckett  RC  $75.00

#102  Pete Rose  $12.00

#103  Bret Saberhagen  $5.00

#105  Tom Seaver  $8.00

 

TOPPS:

#8  Don Mattingly RC  $20.00

#300  Pete Rose  $6.00

#470  Nolan Ryan  $8.00

#490  Cal Ripken Jr.  $6.00

 

TOPPS TRADED:

#103T  Pete Rose  $10.00

 

1983 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


These cards, issued in 1983, are valued at $5 or more:

Sandberg Rookie

 

DONRUSS:

#118 Nolan Ryan  $5.00

#277 Ryne Sandberg RC  $15.00

#279 Cal Ripken Jr.  $5.00

#586 Wade Boggs RC  $10.00

#598 Tony Gwtnn RC  $12.00

 

FLEER:

#70 Cal Ripken Jr.   $6.00

#179 Wade Boggs RC  $12.00

#360 Tony Gwynn RC  $15.00

#463 Nolan Ryan  $6.00

#507 Ryne Sandberg RC  $12.00

 

TOPPS:

#83 Ryne Sandberg RC  $15.00

#100 Pete Rose  $5.00

#163 Cal Ripken Jr. $6.00

#360 Nolan Ryan  $6.00

#361 Nolan Ryan  $6.00

#482 Tony Gwynn RC  $25.00

#498 Wade Boggs RC  $20.00

 

 

TOPPS TRADED:

#77T Joe Morgan  $5.00

#101T Tom Seaver  $8.00

#108T Daryl Strawberry RC $10.00

1982 Cards worth collecting

by card hog


These cards, issued in 1982, are worth $5 or more in near-mint condition.

1982 Topps Traded Cal Ripken #98T

 

DONRUSS:

#1 Pete Rose  $8.00

#13 Nolan Ryan  $6.00

#168 Pete Rose  $5.00

#405 Cal Ripken Jr. RC  $50.00

#419 Nolan Ryan  $5.00

 

FLEER:

#176 Cal Ripken Jr. RC  $40.00

 

TOPPS:

#21 Cal Ripken Jr. RC  $55.00

#383(a) Pascual Perez  $20.00  (an error card, his position – pitcher -  is omitted)

 

TOPPS TRADED:

#47T  Reggie Jackson  $6.00

#98T Cal Ripken Jr.  $150.00

#109T  Ozzie Smith  $25.00

1980-83 Cramer Baseball Legends

by card hog


1980-83 Cramer Baseball Legends

Collector score: **** (4  Stars)

# of cards 125 – 120 cards, 4 cutout cards from boxes, and 1 blank-back Babe Ruth cutout (no number)
Dimensions: 2 1/2 x 3 1/2

Cramer Sports Productions later became Pacific, one of the major card makers of the late 80s and 90s.  The company was founded by Michael Cramer, who owned a card store in Edmonds, Washington.  It took Cramer several years to print the entire set. The last 4 cards were printed on the boxes used to distribute the wax packs, and are scarce.

Although these were mass-produced cards, the numbers issued are miniscule compared with the trillions of cards spewed out by Topps, Donruss, Fleer, and others during that era.  Later, in 1988-90, Cramer created a color series of “Pacific Legends”  which had a much greater print run, and is therefore less collectible.

It is getting more difficult to find a complete set of these, as collectors begin to realize that they are more valuable than almost anything else produced in the early 80s.  They are still available at reasonable prices, making them a bargain for collectors of baseball’s golden age.

Complete set (124 cards) in near-mint condition  $225.00

1980:
1  Babe Ruth   8.00
2  Heinie Manush   1.00
3  Rabbit Maranville  1.00
4  Earl Averill   1.00
5  Joe DiMaggio   5.00
6  Mickey Mantle   6.00
7  Hank Aaron   5.00
8  Stan Musial   5.00
9  Bill Terry   1.00
10  Sandy Koufax   5.00
11  Ernie Lombardi   1.00
12  Dizzy Dean   3.00
13  Lou Gehrig   5.00
14  Walter Alston   1.00
15a  Jackie Robinson  Portrait  6.00
15b  Jackie Robinson  Batting  6.00
16  Jimmie Foxx   2.00
17  Billy Southworth   1.00
18  Honus Wagner   5.00
19  Duke Snider   3.00
20  Rogers Hornsby   2.00
21  Paul Waner   1.00
22  Luke Appling   1.00
23  Billy Herman   1.00
24  Lloyd Waner   1.00
25  Fred Hutchinson   1.00
26  Eddie Collins   2.00
27  Lefty Grove   2.00
28  Chuck Connors   6.00
29  Lefty O’Doul   2.00
30  Hank Greenberg   3.00

1981:
31  Ty Cobb   5.00
32  Enos Slaughter   2.00
33  Ernie Banks   2.00
34  Christy Mathewson   3.00
35  Mel Ott   2.00
36  Pie Traynor   1.00
37  Clark Griffith   1.00
38  Mickey Cochrane  2.00
39  Joe Cronin   1.00
40  Leo Durocher   1.00
41  Frank Baker   1.00
42  Joe Tinker   1.00
43  John McGraw   1.00
44  Bill Dickey   1.00
45  Walter Johnson   3.00
46  Frankie Frisch   2.00
47  Casey Stengel   1.00
48  Willie Mays   4.00
49  Johnny Mize   1.00
50  Roberto Clemente  3.00
51  Burleigh Grimes   1.00
52  Pee Wee Reese   1.00
53  Bob Feller   3.00
54  Brooks Robinson   1.00
55  Sam Crawford   1.00
56  Robin Roberts   1.00
57  Warren Spahn   1.00
58  Joe McCarthy   1.00
59  Jocko Conlan   1.00
60  Satchel Paige   3.00

1982:
61  Ted Williams   4.00
62  George Kelly   1.00
63  Gil Hodges   2.00
64  Jim Bottomley   1.00
65  Al Kaline   2.00
66  Harvey Kuenn   1.00
67  Yogi Berra   2.00
68  Nellie Fox   1.00
69  Harmon Killebrew  2.00
70  Edd Roush   1.00
71  Mordecai Brown   2.00
72  Gabby Hartnett   1.00
73  Early Wynn   1.00
74  Nap Lajoie   1.00
75  Charlie Grimm   1.00
76  Joe Garagiola   1.00
77  Ted Lyons   1.00
78  Mickey Vernon  1.00
79  Lou Boudreau   1.00
80  Al Dark   1.00
81  Ralph Kiner   1.00
82  Phil Rizzuto   2.00
83  Stan Hack   1.00
84  Frank Chance   1.00
85  Ray Schalk   1.00
86  Bill McKechnie   1.00
87  Travis Jackson   1.00
88  Pete Reiser   1.00
89  Carl Hubbell   1.00
90  Roy Campanella   2.00

1983:
91  Cy Young   3.00
92  Kiki Cuyler   1.00
93  Chief Bender   2.00
94  Richie Ashburn   1.00
95  Riggs Stephenson   1.00
96  Minnie Minoso   1.00
97  Hack Wilson   1.00
98  Al Lopez   1.00
99  Willie Keeler   1.00
100  Fred Lindstrom   1.00
101  Roger Maris   3.00
102  Roger Bresnahan   1.00
103  Monty Stratton   1.00
104  Goose Goslin  2.00
105  Earle Combs   1.00
106  Pepper Martin   1.00
107  Joe Jackson   6.00
108  George Sisler   2.00
109  Red Ruffing   1.00
110  Johnny Vander Meer  2.00
111  Herb Pennock   1.00
112  Chuck Klein   1.00
113  Paul Derringer   1.00
114  Addie Joss   1.00
115  Bobby Thomson  1.00
116  Chick Hafey   1.00
117  Lefty Gomez   1.00
118  George Kell   1.00
119  Al Simmons   1.00
120  Bob Lemon   1.00

BOX PANEL CARDS:
121  Hoyt Wilhelm   2.00
122  Arky Vaughan   2.00
123  Frank Robinson  2.00
124  Grover Alexander  2.00

Babe Ruth cut-out, blank back, no number  3.00

 

Ars Longa art cards

by card hog


Collector score: *** (3  Stars)

Ars Longa cards usually sell on eBay in the $8 and up range.

The cards are created and sold by Jesse Loving of San Jose, California.

Of all of the “home made” cards, these are the most artistic.  The players are all from the deadball era, and they are beautifully illustrated.  There are no write-ups on the backs, because they didn’t do that back then.

Ars Longa look and feel like 100 year-old cards - but they are unlikely to ever reach that milestone, due to the limited lifespan inherent in the inks used.

Ars Longa are the class act among home made cards.  But, no matter how attractive they appear, they have no collectible value as a card. The reason is that they are produced on an inkjet, thus there is an unlimited print run, and anyone can reproduce them cheaply.

The other and more important reason is that digital inks are water-soluble, and the air is filled with tiny molecules of water. Light also breaks down the inks, as does ozone – two things which are omnipresent, even in the most controlled environment. These factors will eventually dissolve the ink.  This will occur within somewhere between 10 and 100 years in a museum setting, much sooner at home.  The cards will never survive long enough to acquire any age-related value.

(NOTE:  Although manufacturers of digital inks and papers claim their prints will last as long as 120 years, these claims have been refuted by Wilhelm Imaging Research – a research lab which is regularly hired by printer vendors to test longevity of various papers, printers, and inks.  For example, Kodak claims a life of 120 years for prints using their best archival papers.  Wilhelm’s research found such prints will last only 11 years.)

Ars Longa Art Cards are, according to their web site, printed with the highest quality pigment inks on the finest 24 mil, acid-free archival card stock.  They further state that “all materials are chosen for their quality and ability to withstand the tests of time, storage, handling, and display.”  According to Wilhelm Imaging Research, pigment ink on acid-free card stock will last 6-8 years under normal conditions before noticeable fading begins.  The upper range, under museum conditions, is going to be 28-55 years, according to Wilhelm.  That’s just not good enough.

However, I would bet these cards are still going to outlast all other home made cards, because they are made better.  They are also sprayed with an art spray which provides more protection.  In spite of all of this fine workmanship, they still won’t be around in 100 years.

The card stock used is of a perfect thickness and feel.  There is no laminating. The cards often have rounded corners, and are slightly “distressed” by the maker.  Because the cards are so nicely made and actually feel and look old, a novice could easily buy one, thinking he is buying something that is over 100 years old.  However, a close examination of the card backs will reveal the printing date in Roman numerals.

At least Ars Longa isn’t using some old cardmaker’s name (like Helmar and Sporting Life), and they aren’t copying old Topps and Bowman designs (like Lemke).  They are doing their own thing, and doing it well.

I find myself awarding three stars to cards which have no collectible value, only because these cards are probably valuable as folk art, and because they are original works and beautiful to look at – and because the subjects are mostly players you can find nowhere else.

PRICING: If you own one or more of these cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  Assuming you’re going to be honest about it, you can’t really sell it as a collectible, because it is new, and because it is only temporary.  So it becomes a modern reproduction, an “objet d’art” if you will.  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.  There are people who buy these cards all the time, apparently knowing exactly what they are getting. In describing the item, I would advise that you avoid two terms:  “rare” and “collectible” because inkjet-created cards are not rare, since they have a print run which is open-ended and can be easily reproduced by anyone.  And, as mentioned above, they will not last long enough to be collectible.

Dave Stewart cards

by card hog


Collector score: ***** (5  Stars)

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition


Dave Stewart was a disabled Vietnam Veteran who created a modest number of unusual cards in San Francisco during the 1980s and early 1990s.  All of his creations feature an American Flag and a POW/MIA Flag with the legend “Support Disabled American Veterans”.  They are 2 x 3-1/2 inches in size.

Nobody knows what ever happened to Dave. He lived in the Richmond neighborhood off Balboa from the early 1970s until sometime in the 90s, and spent a lot of time at the VA Hospital on Clement Street. Before motorized wheelchairs were widely available, he built his own using marine batteries, and was often seen chugging down the streets in the area. The cards he created were usually black & white or sepia. The subjects of his cards were often obscure or unusual.  He found his images in books at the San Francisco Public Library.

Stewart gave away his baseball cards in exchange for any donation, and presumably used the money to help pay his living expenses. His printing costs were often financed by friends and those who enjoyed his cards – reportedly including western novelist Louis L’Amour, who once paid off a $300 printing bill for Stewart.

It is not known how many of each card Dave Stewart produced, but it is most likely 500 as this was the minimum number of cards most commercial printers would produce in those pre-digital days.  Prescott Printing Company printed some, but not all Dave Stewarts.

Card Retail Values:

Complete set of 34 cards $375-425

(in near mint condition)

1859 Abraham Lincoln, Springfield Nine       $20.00
1888 Billy Sunday, Pittsburgh     $12.00
1896 Zane Grey, University of Pennsylvania     $12.00
1921 Lefty O’Doul,San Francisco Seals  $8.00
1924 John Dillinger, Martinsville Athletics     $30.00
1924 Nick Altrock, Washington Senators     $8.00
1925 Shoeless Joe Jackson, Waycross, Georgia League     $20.00
1926 Red Grange, Chicago Bears     $15.00
1926 Mel Ott, NY Giants   $10.00
1927 Lefty Brown, Negro League star pitcher NYC   $25.00
1933 Joe DiMaggio, San Francisco Seals   $12.00
1938 Ernie Lombardi, Cincinnati Reds     $8.00
1938 Josh Gibson, Homestead Grays   $12.00
1940 Stan Musial, Daytona Beach     $15.00
1941 Fred Hutchinson, Detroit Tigers     $10.00
1947 Bill Thomas, Evangeline League     $8.00
1949 Bob Cobb, Hollywood Stars PCL     $8.00
1949 Joe Louis, undefeated World Heavyweight Boxing Champion $12.00
1950 Fidel Castro, Havana Nacionales     $20.00
1950 Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants   $12.00
1951 Chuck Connors, Los Angeles PCL     $20.00
1951 Kyle Rote, Corpus Christi Aces     $8.00
1951 Louis L’Amour, Author, Los Angeles     $8.00
1952 Leon Day, Scranton Miners   $10.00
1956 Frank Robinson, Cincinnati Reds     $10.00
1957 Bob Hazle, Milwaukee Braves     $6.00
1961 Joe Namath, Beaver Falls     $15.00
1964 Tony Conigliaro, Boston Red Sox     $10.00
1969 Thurman Munson, New York Yankees   $10.00
1970 Joe Kapp, Minnesota Vikings   $8.00
1971 Ann Calvello Roller Derby star San Francisco Bay Area Bombers $8.00
1974 Sonny Jurgensen, Washington Redskins $10.00
1977 Kurt Russell, El Paso Sun Kings $15.00
1982 John Elway, minor league baseball card $15.00

 

King Cards

by card hog


Collector score: ***** (5  Stars)

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition

 

King Cards come in two sizes: 2 x 3 and 2.5 x 3.5
They are designed and produced by retired printer and sports fan Ricardo Reyes of Greenville, South Carolina.  They are printed on glossy card stock. 250 of each card are produced on an AB Dick 360 (2-color) offset press – which means they are run through twice to get full color, then the process is repeated on the reverse side.  It takes a great pressman to do this, and a lot of good paper is wasted just getting the proper registration. The end result is, these really look vintage, although they imitate none of the old card sets.
The King cards are not only “cards that never were” – they are also “card designs that never were” featuring vintage design elements, ads offering guns for kids, Chocolate flavored chewing gum (by the World’s Worst Gum Co. according to the fine print), and a fresh design scheme.
Reyes keeps a few cards for himself and his friends, and consigns 200 of each card to an eBay card seller.  All proceeds, according to Reyes, are used to furnish gas, beer, and bait for his fishing problem. His first card was issued in 2011, so these are fairly new.
Here is a list of all cards issued by Reyes, and their estimated retail value in near-mint condition:

 

2 x 3 cards:
1902 Christy Mathewson, Pittsburgh Stars NFL football  $8.00
1923 Doc Tally, House Of David exhibition team  $5.00
1936 Bob Feller, Cleveland Indians 17 year-old rookie  $5.00
1944 Joe Nuxhall, age 15, Cincinnati Reds youngest player ever $3.00
1952 Hank Aaron, Indianapolis Clowns Negro League  $10.00
1959 Carl Yastrzemski, Raleigh Capitols  $5.00
1968 Phil Robertson, Quarterback, Louisiana Tech, Duck Dynasty $5.00

2.5 x 3.5 cards:
1887 Wilhelm Steinitz, World Chess Champion  $4.00
1894 Emanuel Lasker, World Chess Champion  $5.00
1951 Reefer Madness, free ticket presented by Oral Roberts  $4.00
1956 Pittsburgh Steelers Draft Picks: Curley Johnson & Len Dawson  $5.00
1956 Green Bay Packers Draft Picks: Forrest Gregg & Bart Starr  $10.00
1957 New York Giants Draft Picks: Don Maynard & Sam DeLuca  $4.00
1958 Blaze Starr, ShoBar New Orleans burlesque stripper  $10.00
1959 Candy Barr at the Colony Club, Dallas – famous burlesque dancer  $6.00
1962 Shari Angel, stripper, New Years Eve Jack Ruby Carousel Club  $6.00
1964 Cleveland Browns Draft Picks: Paul Warfield & Leroy Kelly  $4.00
1965 Chicago Bears Draft Picks Dick Butkus & Gale Sayers  $5.00 *
1966 Phil Robertson, Pitcher/Outfielder North Caddo HS, Duck Dynasty $5.00
1968 Miami Dolphins Rookies Larry Csonka & Jim Kiick  $6.00
1970 Pittsburgh Steelers Rookies Terry Bradshaw & Mel Blount $8.00

*An error version of the Butkus/Sayers card exists.  The Butkus photo on the error card is actually his teammate at Illinois, Bruce Capel.  Although Butkus wore #51 in the pros, Capel wore #51 at Illinois, which accounts for the error. Bruce Capel played center, and because of Bruce’s ability at the position, Butkus was switched over to play mostly on defense and ultimately became the greatest middle-linebacker in NFL history.  This error card is the only sports card on which Bruce Capel appears.  He died a hero in combat in Vietnam in 1966.  Only about two dozen of this card were distributed before the error was noticed, and all remaining cards were destroyed.  The error card is nearly impossible to find and is valued at $25.00 or more.

(CARDHOG 2013)

 

 

Bob Lemke cards

by card hog


Collector score: *** (3  Stars)

Of all of the various home-made cards, the ones made by Lemke are by far the most interesting and attractive. Lemke is unquestionably the laureate of the homemade card craft.  But, sadly, his cards are still worthless, because they are made on an inkjet printer.

Book value for cards produced on an inkjet printer is zero, because:

1. The print run never ends.  They may be reproduced forever, by anyone with an ink jet printer.

2. The ink used in inkjet printers degrades quickly, and these cards will not last long enough to acquire any age-related value.

However, where else are you going to get a football card of Bill Cosby?

Bob sells his cards (reluctantly, it seems) for $12 each.  He’s a professional card historian, formerly the editor of the Standard Catalog of Baseball Cards, and a publisher in his own right.  Semi-retired, he now writes a blog about his favorite thing in the world: Baseball cards (along with a little bit of football).

His cards are true “Cards that never were” as they are all in the format of existing card sets, mostly vintage Topps and Bowman designs.  It’s not easy making an authentic-looking 1954 Topps for a player (Bobby Thomson) who didn’t appear in the set that year. Two photos and a logo on front, 3 cartoons on back, plus a signature.  This is challenging work, and no one is better at it than Lemke is.

Also, there is no effort by Lemke to conceal the fact that these are new creations, home-made using an inkjet printer.  He does not do any significant “marketing” of his work, and does not operate an eBay store.  His work is a hobby, done purely for his own satisfaction.

 

It is difficult to assign a collector score of 3 stars to cards which are technically worthless.  I do so only because Lemke issues cards that you cannot get any other way.  They are perhaps worth something as a type of folk art.

However, there is no sound basis for assigning any collectible value to these type of cards.  Anyone who has one can simply scan it and reproduce an unlimited number of them.  Also, as the ink begins to deteriorate, the cards will eventually go away.  They should last perhaps 6-10 years in an album before the fading becomes noticeable.

As nice as they are, they are worth nothing as a collectible sports card due to that fatal flaw. However, they are interesting and very nicely done.

PRICING: If you own one or more of these cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  Assuming you’re going to be honest about it, you can’t really sell it as a collectible, because it is new, and because it is only temporary.  So it becomes a modern reproduction, an “objet d’art” if you will.  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.  There are people who buy these cards all the time, apparently knowing exactly what they are getting. In describing the item, I would advise that you avoid two terms:  “rare” and “collectible” because inkjet-created cards are not rare, since they have a print run which is open-ended and can be easily reproduced by anyone.  And, as mentioned above, they will not last long enough to be collectible.

Klector – Cab Cards

by card hog


Collector score: **** (4  Stars)

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition

thorpekelector

All Klector cards are rare, since only 400 of each was printed and released.

Bernard Kleckner of New York created these cards by colorizing old black & white photos using colored chalk. He typed the backs on a typewriter.  This gives them a crude “home made” appearance. They are, however, well-written and researched. The cards were printed on glossy card stock at Solomon Printing.

Cards with Bernie Kleckner’s NYC Taxi Medallion number (2M25) are worth slightly more, as they were created during his tenure as a cab driver (1981-91) and are harder to find.  Kleckner usually gave a free card to his passengers in order to encourage repeat business, thus they are also called “cab cards”.

 

Retail values – Near Mint condition:

Complete set of 24 cards  $300.00 – 325.00

1905 Ty Cobb, Detriot Tigers $25.00
1910 Shoeless Joe Jackson New Orleans Pelicans $20.00
1920 Jim Thorpe Canton Football Player $15.00
1925 Jack Dempsey Heavyweight Boxing Champion $15.00
1928 Casey Stengel, Toledo Mudhens $12.00
1930 Babe Ruth, New York Yankees $15.00
1930 Bobby Jones, Grand Slam Golf Champion $15.00
1931 Nick Cullop, Minneapolis Millers $8.00
1947 Jackie Robinson, Brooklyn Dodgers $15.00
1950 Mickey Mantle, Joplin Miners $20.00
1951 Larry Evans, chess champion $10.00
1952 Allie Reynolds, New York Yankees  $5.00
1961 Fran Tarkenton, Minnesota Vikings $12.00
1961 Roger Maris, New York Yankees $12.00
1962 Wilt Chamberlain, Philadelphia Warriors $20.00
1962 Marvelous Marv Throneberry, New York Mets $8.00
1966 Jim Brown, Cleveland Browns $15.00
1969 Joe Namath, New York Jets $15.00
1972 Joe Frazier, Heavyweight Boxing Champion $12.00
1973 Bobby Fischer, World Chess Champion  $20.00
1977 Rickey Henderson, Modesto Athletics $15.00
1977 Pele, New York Cosmos $15.00
1979 Muhammad Ali, Heavyweight Boxing Champion $20.00
1983 Andre The Giant World Heavyweight Wrestling Champion $8.00

 

Giclee

by card hog


Collector score: * (1  Stars)

There is  no company named “giclee” – it is a French way of saying “ink jet” which describes the way these cards are printed.  It is also a slang word (in French) which means male ejaculation.

A giclee card is simply a card produced on an inkjet printer.

Some giclee cards are produced using original art, and may have some negligible collectible value.  Those which are simply reprints of old cards are worthless.

This original painting by CABEZA de VACA is valued at more than $3,000.00 - but the giclee baseball card version is worth zilch...

Giclee sports cards can have no book value  for the following reasons:

1. The print run never ends.  They may be reproduced forever, by anyone with an ink jet printer.

2. The ink used in these printers degrades quickly, and these cards will not last long enough to acquire any age-related value.

(NOTE:  Although manufacturers of ink jet printers and papers claim their prints will last as long as 120 years, these claims have been refuted by Wilhelm Imaging Research – a research lab which is regularly hired by printer vendors to test longevity of various printers and inks.  For example, Kodak claims a life of 120 years for prints using their best archival papers.  Wilhelm’s research found such prints will last only 11 years.)

HOWEVER….

The original art used to create a giclee print may or may not have value, depending on the artists reputation and the quality of the art.  The original art is never referred to as “giclee” because it is typically a sketch or painting.

A “giclee sketch card” is still an inkjet printing, and is not the original art, thus it is also without value.  I am not saying nobody will buy it. I am simply saying it has no collectible value, and that is what this guide exists for.

ALSO….

“Artist signed” giclee cards may have some intrinsic value, based solely on the value of the artist’s autograph.  If the artist is famous, and their autograph has value, this would also be the approximate value of the giclee print.  The fact that there is an inkjet print of their work attached does not increase the value of the autograph significantly.  In this case, it is the autograph which has value, not the print itself.

Large giclee prints – not card sized, but large enough to hang on a wall in a frame, may have some value as decor, but no collectible value, except numbered limited editions signed by the artist. The value remains primarily in the signature.

As a collectible sports card, a giclee has little desirability.  Why not just buy your own ink jet and start “ejaculating” your own cards?

PRICING: If you own one or more of these cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  Assuming you’re going to be honest about it, you can’t really sell it as a collectible, because it is new, and because it is only temporary.  So it becomes a modern reproduction, an “objet d’art” if you will.  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.  There are people who buy these cards all the time, apparently knowing exactly what they are getting. In describing the item, I would advise that you avoid two terms:  “rare” and “collectible” because inkjet-created cards are not rare, since they have a print run which is open-ended and can be easily reproduced by anyone.  And, as mentioned above, they will not last long enough to be collectible.

Miller Press Printing Co.

by card hog


Miller Press Baseball

 

 

minor leaguer Shoeless Joe Jackson five years after being banned from baseball.

minor league player-manager Shoeless Joe Jackson five years after being banned from baseball. Full sized card printed on varnish coated parchment card stock.

Collector score: **** (4  Stars)

Allen Miller Sr. was a printer and a newspaper publisher between 1985 and 2005, the era when most these cards were produced.  Miller Press cards were given away free over the years by the company as sales samples for commercial printing and design jobs.  Possibly the best-written cards ever produced. They are, however, hard to locate due to the microscopic numbers printed. This makes them difficult to collect.

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition

Complete set of 100 cards:  $2,200.00

Set of 5 initial Hall Of Famers ($100.00)
1900 Honus Wagner Hall Of Fame Anniversary edition – 200 printed $20.00
1908 Christy Mathewson Hall Of Fame Anniversary edition – 200 printed $15.00
1909 Ty Cobb Hall Of Fame Anniversary edition – (DP) 400 printed $20.00
1913 Walter Johnson Hall Of Fame Anniversary edition – 200 printed $15.00
1923 Babe Ruth Hall Of Fame Anniversary edition – 200 printed $30.00

Set of 8 top players of 1900 – Centennials ($50.00)
1900 Kid Nichols – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00
1900 Noodles Hahn – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00
1900 Rube Waddell – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $8.00
1900 Ginger Beaumont – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00
1900 Elmer Flick – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00
1900 Marty Bergen – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00
1900 Herman Long – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00
1900 Iron Joe McGinnity – Wood background Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $6.00

King Of Diamonds Series 12 cards ($220.00)
1934  Dizzy Dean – Limited Edition King Of Diamonds – 200 printed $12.00
1946 Hank Greenberg – Limited Edition King Of Diamonds – 200 printed $12.00
1949  Stan Musial – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $15.00
1950 Jackie Robinson – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $25.00
1951  Yogi Berra – Limited Edition King Of Diamonds – 200 printed $12.00
1952  Monte Irvin – Limited Edition King Of Diamonds – 200 printed $10.00
1955  Willie Mays – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $20.00
1956  Duke Snider – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $15.00
1957 Mickey Mantle – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $25.00
1965 Harmon Killebrew – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $20.00
1966 Sandy Koufax – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $25.00
1970 Pete Rose – Limited Edition King of Diamonds – 200 printed $30.00

Set of 8 banished Chicago Black Sox + team card($145.00)
1919  Eddie Cicotte – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $15.00
1919  Oscar “Happy” Felsch – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $10.00
1919  Arnold “Chick” Gandil – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $10.00
1919  “Shoeless” Joe Jackson – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $50.00
1919  Fred McMullin – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $10.00
1919  Charles “Swede” Risberg – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $10.00
1919  George “Buck” Weaver – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $15.00
1919  Claude “Lefty” Williams – Banned from baseball  2.25 x 3 – 200 printed $10.00
1919 American League Champions team card – 2.25 x 3 – 200 printed – $15.00

Set of 9 Yankees Murderers Row ($220.00)
1927  Lou Gehrig – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $40.00
1927  Earle Combs – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $25.00
1927  Tony Lazzeri – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $25.00
1927  Bob Meusel – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $20.00
1927  Babe Ruth – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $60.00
1927  Waite Hoyt – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $15.00
1927  Wilcy Moore – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $10.00
1927  Herb Pennock – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $15.00
1927  Urban Shocker – NY Yankees Murderers Row – 200 printed $10.00

Set of 12 Baseball Goes To War ($165.00)
1947  Bob Feller – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $20.00
1947  Murry Dickson – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $10.00
1948   Harry Walker – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $10.00
1949 Gene Bearden – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $10.00
1950   Lou Brissie – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $15.00
1953  Hoyt Wilhelm – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $15.00
1955  Yogi Berra – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $15.00
1955  Gil Hodges – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $20.00
1955  Hank Thompson – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $10.00
1959  Hank Bauer – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $10.00
1963  Ralph Houk – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $10.00
1964  Warren Spahn – Baseball Goes To War series – 200 printed $20.00

Set of 4 Shoeless Joe Jackson cards ($100.00)
1911 Shoeless Joe Jackson Rookie card – 200 printed $30.00
1916 Shoeless Joe Jackson Traded card – 200 printed  $25.00
1921 Shoeless Joe Jackson Banished card – 200 printed $25.00
1926 Shoeless Joe Jackson Minor League card – 200 printed $25.00

1940-42 Top players 12 cards ($250.00)
1940 Ted Williams – Rookie – 200 printed $50.00
1940 Joe Dimaggio – MVP – 200 printed $50.00
1940 Lou Gehrig – Retires – 200 printed $30.00
1940 Bucky Walters – MVP – 200 printed  $20.00
1941 Hank Greenberg – MVP – 200 printed $15.00
1941 Pee Wee Reese – Rookie – 200 printed $15.00
1941 Bob Feller – 27 wins – 200 printed $20.00
1941 Frank McCormick – MVP – 200 printed  $10.00
1942 Joe DiMaggio – 57 game hitting streak – 200 printed $20.00
1942 Dolph Camilli – National League MVP – 200 printed $10.00
1942 Ted Williams – Last .400 hitter – 200 printed $25.00
1942 Phil Rizzuto – Rookie – 200 printed  $15.00

Minor Leaguers 8 cards ($125.00)
1950 Whitey Ford – Binghamton Triplets – 500 printed  $10.00
1954 Hank Aaron – Jacksonville Tars – 500 printed  $20.00
1955 Roger Maris – Keokuk Kernels – 500 printed  $15.00
1962 Pete Rose – Tampa Tarpons – 500 printed  $20.00
1967 Nolan Ryan – Greenville Mets – 500 printed  $25.00
1967 Reggie Jackson – Modesto Reds – 500 printed  $20.00
1967 Tom Seaver – Jacksonville – 500 printed  $15.00
1969 Thurman Munson – Binghamton – 500 printed $15.00

Misc. single card issues:
1900 Kid Nichols – black border Centennial silver back – 200 printed $40.00
1900 Noodles Hahn – black border Centennial silver back – 200 printed $35.00
1900 Marty Bergen – Glossy Centennial, a baseball tragedy 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $15.00
1901 Napoleon Lajoie – varnished litho Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $10.00
1905 John Anderson – Dumbest player in history – 200 printed $15.00
1905 Ed Delahanty – Unsolved death of baseball’s top hitter – 200 printed $15.00
1909 Rube Waddell – varnished litho Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $15.00
1910 Chief Bender – varnished litho Centennial 2 x 3.5 – 200 printed $10.00
1914 Ed Collins – Philadelphia Athletics MVP print run 200   $15.00
1916 Babe Ruth – Pitcher, Boston Red Sox – 200 printed $40.00
1920 George Halas – NY Yankees, later a Pro Football Hall Of Famer – 200 printed $25.00
1920  Hal Chase – banned for life – 200 printed very scarce  $40.00
1920 Shoeless Joe Jackson museum promo card – 200 printed $20.00
1921 Ray Chapman – Cleveland, Killed by pitch – 200 printed $15.00
1938 Joe Medwick – National League MVP – 200 printed very scarce  $50.00
1941  Hugh Mulcahy – “Losing Pitcher” Mulcahy Hard luck pitcher – 200 printed very scarce  $30.00
1941 Willard Hershberger – Reds catcher, a baseball tragedy – 200 printed very scarce  $40.00
1952 Eddie Gaedel – Midget Ballplayer – 200 printed $30.00
1956 Rocky Colavito – The Curse Of Colavito – 200 printed $20.00
1985 Babe Ruth (Red Sox) – black border gold back. Batting & Pitching stats – 200 printed $80.00
1996 Jesus Christ MVP – Printed for Baseball Crusade – 400  printed – $20.00

NOTE:  Allen Miller’s sons Allen Jr. and Bob Miller created several cards which are not considered Miller Press cards, although the name Miller Press appears on the backs.  This is because they were issued after Allen Miller Sr. had passed on, and after Miller Press had closed.  Book values for these cards is in the $5-10 range. They  include:

1955 Joe Bauman, Roswell Rockets print run 200
1977 Rocky Perone, Imposter Rookie print run 200
1951 Sal Maglie, Sal the Barber print run 200
1970 Dock Ellis, No-Hitter on LSD print run 200
2009 John Odom, Traded For Bats print run 200

Helmar Brewing

by card hog


Collector score: * (1  Stars)

Helmar Brewing is a “contract brewer” of beer.  That simply means that they do not brew beer (in spite of their name), rather, they buy beer from real breweries and slap their label on it.  However, they do not seem to actually be in the beer business, as their web site does not offer any way of ordering beer or finding distributors.

What they are in the business of doing is printing “baseball cards” on an inkjet printer and selling them in the $20 to $250 range on eBay.

Simply put, the cards are awful.  In fact, the word awful isn’t strong enough. Here’s why:

First and foremost, a person buys a sports card, especially a tribute card, as a little piece of history.  The writing and images found on the card ought to be accurate.  Look carefully at this Helmar card of Billy Sunday which sold recently for $25 on eBay:

"Help me, Jesus! I'm trapped inside of a beer advertisement!!!"

You probably noticed right away that it says Billy is a pitcher.  That’s a pretty glaring error.  Billy was an outfielder, and most baseball fans know that.  You don’t have to be a SABR nerd to know that Billy wasn’t a pitcher, even kids know that.

But even if you know nothing at all about baseball, Sunday looms large in American history.

More than any other person, he legitimized the prohibition movement.  Sure, Carrie Nation raised hell with her hatchet act, but she and her ilk were a sideshow.  It was Billy Sunday who galvanized an entire nation to outlaw alcohol consumption.  It was Billy Sunday who convinced more than half of all Americans that alcohol was the Devil’s tool to ruin lives.  Billy Sunday walked away from the sport he loved and dedicated the next three decades of his life to stamping out the use of alcohol.  He traversed the land, giving stirring sermons which were heard by millions.

So how do you think he’d feel about having his picture on a card advertising a brewery?  With a giant beer bottle, and wearing a shirt advertising beer?  He’s probably revolving in his grave!

Then there’s this gem of German boxer Max Schmeling:

"Something schmells about this card..."

You probably  noticed immediately that his name is misspelled, even if you’re not a big fan of boxing.

I didn’t look for bad examples – these were the first two Helmar cards I looked at on eBay!

Since the cards are created using an inkjet printer, and sold on eBay, you would think that the creator of the cards would have access to a computer, and know about Google, and would at least look up the player to make sure the name and any other details are correct.  This makes one think that Helmar cards are not created by a sports fan, certainly not a baseball fan, and their home-made “cards” are just a way they have found to make money selling a product of dubious value.

These are cards apparently created by and for the “illiterati”.   If you do not read your baseball cards, and only look at the pictures, these cards might be for you.

The name of this outfit is troubling as well.  There was a Helmar Tobacco company which issued old tobacco cards about 100 years ago. They made beautiful lithographic cards which were inserted into their products. These cards are very valuable today.  This questionable use of the Helmar name is a gimmick, and is confusing to novice collectors.  This company has no relation to the original Helmar cards, and is simply trading on their good name.

Another gimmick is that these cards are intentionally damaged in order to make them appear old.  Since any book value would have to be based on card condition, how would one account for the intentional damage done to them?

Because these cards are not printed on a printing press, they cannot have any book value.  Cards created using digital inkjet or laser printers can easily be copied, and there is no actual “print run” made – they are printed one at a time at someone’s desk.  It is not feasible to issue book values for home-made cards generated on an inkjet printer.  The company claims that they only print “no more than 40″ of each card, but there is no way to know this, since there is no actual print run.  In fact, in another publicity writeup, the company claims they only make 15-20 of each card. And in yet another, they say they only make 4-6 of each card!  So which is the truth? My guess is, any time they sell a card, someone simply hits CTRL+P and “issues” another copy!

When cards are printed on a press, there is a large up-front cost.  If you went to your local printing company and asked how much to print 100 Topps-size cards on thick card stock, the answer is going to be at least $200.  So this means that each card will cost $2.00 to print.  The same printer might tell you that he will print 1,000 for just $300, which would lower your cost to 30 cents per card.   The more you print, the lower your cost per card – and the lower the card value, since they are ten times less scarce.   This at least provides a basis for establishing some kind of value, as well as a known print run.  Ink jet creations are not like this.  There is no up front cost, and the print run never ends.  That is why they are worthless.

More important than any of this is the fact that these cards will all be gone before they can become collectible. The inks and toners used in digital printing fade very rapidly. Cards printed using traditional presses and real ink will last nearly forever, but digital inks break down much faster.  Within a few years, they will be gone, even if they are kept in a plastic sleeve.  Thus, these cards, made to appear old, will never actually be old enough to have any age-related value!  Even under glass, the ink will fade to a ghost-like image in less than 20 years.

(NOTE:  Although manufacturers of ink jet printers and papers claim their prints will last as long as 120 years, these claims have been refuted by Wilhelm Imaging Research – a research lab which is regularly hired by printer vendors to test longevity of various printers and inks.  For example, Kodak claims a life of 120 years for prints using their best archival papers.  Wilhelm’s research found such prints will last only 11 years.)

The owner of Helmar Brewing has said of his cards:  “They are made here, on the same 12 color press that the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art uses to produce their high-end lithographs. “  However, the NY Metropolitan Museum of Art does not use a press.  They create their prints on an Epson 9600 inkjet printer using Ultrachrome inks, a fact which Epson likes to remind us of in their marketing.  Why did he make such an audacious statement on a collector blog? There is no way to innocently confuse a 12 head printing press with an inkjet printer.

And I hate to pile on, but it must also be said that these cards are very often badly cut and very frequently off-center. This is not part of the intentional damage scheme, it is due to poor workmanship and/or inferior cutting equipment used in the finishing stage.

Having held the finished product in my hand, it is clear that a good amount of labor went into their creation.  An effort has clearly been made to create something collectible.  The type of stock used for the fronts and backs appears to be high-quality matte photo paper.  The fronts and backs are printed separately, then glued to a cardboard center. The sheets are then compressed until dried and cut into individual cards.  The end result is a very thick card – too thick in fact  They measure at over 3 times the thickness of a typical tobacco card from 100 years ago, making them feel like a brick.  The edges are rough, not well cut, and the lamination is clearly visible even from several feet away. You can easily tell it was not printed on a press, and that it is made by pasting the images onto cardboard.  Even a novice would know immediately it is not old.  But to someone not holding the card, just looking at it on a screen, it might easily appear old.  The scans look better than the actual card does.

Overall, the Helmar cards are not worth collecting.  Too many gimmicks, too much misinformation and deception, and not enough value to make them worthwhile.

I am not saying they can not be sold, simply that they have no measurable value as collectible cards.

PRICING: If you own one or more of these cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  Assuming you’re going to be honest about it, you can’t really sell it as a collectible, because it is new, and because it is only temporary.  So it becomes a modern reproduction, an “objet d’art” if you will.  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.  There are people who buy these cards all the time, apparently knowing exactly what they are getting. In describing the item, I would advise that you avoid two terms:  “rare” and “collectible” because inkjet-created cards are not rare, since they have a print run which is open-ended and can be easily reproduced by anyone.  And, as mentioned above, they will not last long enough to be collectible.

 

Infinite Card Set

by card hog


Infinite Baseball Card set by Gary Cieradkowski
Dimensions: 2   x  3  1/2

infinite

Collector score: ** (2  Stars)

Unusual oddball cards with original art, created by graphic design artist and amateur baseball historian Gary Cieradkowski.  Featuring great write-ups on the back, the legitimate offset-printed versions of this set have become pretty much extinct.  The Infinite set has ceased to be produced in the offset-printed litho form, and Cieradkowski is offering “home made” inkjet-created (see giclee) cards now.

This is quite disappointing to those who started collecting a set of offset-printed cards that would last nearly forever, only to have the production changed in mid-stream into “temporary cards” made on a home printer.

It is very easy to tell the difference between the litho versions and the ink jet versions.  The litho versions are thicker and have a glossy UV coating on both sides.  The inkjet versions lack the thick glossy surface, and are sometimes poorly cut.

Book value for Infinite cards produced on an inkjet printer is of course, zero, because:

1. The print run never ends.  They may be reproduced forever, by anyone with an ink jet printer.

2. The ink used in inkjet printers degrades quickly, and these cards will not last long enough to acquire any age-related value.

(NOTE:  Although manufacturers of ink jet printers and papers claim their prints will last as long as 120 years, these claims have been refuted by Wilhelm Imaging Research – a research lab which is regularly hired by printer vendors to test longevity of various printers and inks.  For example, Kodak claims a life of 120 years for prints using their best archival papers.  Wilhelm’s research found such prints will last only 11 years.)

Retail value for the early litho-printed Infinite cards is in the $5-10 range, with the exception of two cards:

#1 Leon Day, was Ceiradkowski’s first card. It is very scarce, and should retail for $10-15 in mint shape.

#27 Sandy Koufax, University Of Cincinnati. This particular card was withdrawn by Ceiradkowski after he was instructed to do so by someone at the university, because they said it violated licensing laws.  It probably didn’t, but Gary erred on the side of caution, and the Koufax card was yanked, and thus remains extremely rare.  Retail value for #27 should start at $15.00 on the low end.  On the high end, well, I’d say…. infinite!

PRICING: If you own one or more of the inkjet versions of the Infinite  cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  Assuming you’re going to be honest about it, you can’t really sell it as a collectible, because it is new, and because it is only temporary.  So it becomes a modern reproduction, an “objet d’art” if you will.  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.  There are people who buy these cards all the time, apparently knowing exactly what they are getting. In describing the item, I would advise that you avoid two terms:  “rare” and “collectible” because inkjet-created cards are not rare, since they have a print run which is open-ended and can be easily reproduced by anyone.  And, as mentioned above, they will not last long enough to be collectible.

(CARDHOG)

Monarch Corona

by card hog


Monarch Corona

Collector score: **** (4  Stars)

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition

It’s no accident that these cards have a lot in common with the Miller Press cards. They were produced by Allen Miller Jr.  of Monarch Corona Printing.  Like the original Millers, these cards have been given away over the years as printing samples and donated to charity auctions.  Leftover samples, usually 50-100 of each card, are sold on consignment by a couple of eBay card dealers.  Most of the images used are colorized black & white photos, and the work seems to be nicely done.  Because they are samples intended to generate printing sales, the cards usually feature thick glossy UV coating and brilliant inks.  Of all of the modern cards created by hobbyists, the Monarch Corona cards are the most likely to become highly valuable collectibles in the future. This is due to the fact that their production runs are well-documented, designs are above average, subject matter is interesting, low numbers are produced, and a number of interesting subsets exist.  One negative factor is that the subsets seem to end prematurely. The Legacy Series was supposed to be a large series of historical figures, but ended after only 9 cards were released.  The American Pastime series ended after only six cards were made.  The Super Toys series, which feature backs written by Allen Miller Sr. in the 1970s for a toy company, was supposed to be a 75 card set, but to date, only 7 of them have been printed.  It’s as if they grow tired of a design format and simply abandon it. If not for that practice, Monarch Corona would receive 5 stars.

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First Series of 16 cards (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
#01  1952  Satchel Paige, St. Louis Browns   $20.00
#02  1946 Hal Newhouser, Detroit Tigers   $6.00
#03  1933 Jimmie Foxx, Philadelphia athletics   $10.00
#04  1971 Roberto Clemente, Pittsburgh Pirates   $15.00
#05  1952 Charley Pride, Memphis Red Sox Negro League    $25.00
#06  1859 Paul Morphy, World Chess Champion    $15.00
#07  1923 Lou Gehrig, Pitcher, Columbia University    $15.00
#08  1878 Bob “Death to Flying Things” Ferguson   $6.00
#09  1926 Pete Alexander, St. Louis Cardinals    $8.00
#10  1946 Moe Berg, Spy – Boston Red Sox    $10.00
#11  1933 Joe Cronin, Mgr/SS Boston Red Sox   $6.00
#12  1905 Ty Cobb star rookie, Detroit Tigers   $12.00
#13  1973 Pete Rose, MVP, Cincinnati Reds    $12.00
#14  1969 Nolan Ryan, New York Mets   $10.00
#15  1959 Johnny Unitas, MVP, Baltimore Colts   $15.00
#16  1920 Babe Ruth, New York Yankees   $12.00

(A very few of each card in the series above are signed on the back by Allen Miller Jr. – who designed them.  Signed examples are generally considered to be worth twice as much.)

MVPs of 1953 Series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1953 New York Yankees Team Card, Yogi Berra #53A1     $6.00
1953 Al Rosen, American League Top Hitter #53A2    $4.00
1953 Tigers Rookies Kaline Bertoia Lary #53A3     $8.00
1953 Ed Lopat, American League Top Pitcher #53A4    $4.00
1953 Brooklyn Dodgers Team Card, Gil Hodges #53N1    $6.00
1953 Frank Thomas, National League Top Rookie #53N2    $4.00
1953 Ed Mathews, National League Top Hitter  #53N3    $8.00
1953 Harvey Haddix, National League Top Pitcher #53N4    $4.00

Shoeless Joe Career Set (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1911 Shoeless Joe Jackson Rookie season – 200 printed   $5.00
1916 Shoeless Joe Jackson Traded – 200 printed   $4.00
1921 Shoeless Joe Jackson Banished – 200 printed   $4.00
1926 Shoeless Joe Jackson Waycross, Minor League – 200 printed   $4.00

Columbia Litho Print Samples (100 printed, 2 x 3):
1904 Dummy Taylor, New York Giants,  Columbia Litho print sample     $5.00
1912 The Arlington, New Orleans bordello, Columbia Litho print sample     $6.00
1924 Babe Rith, New York Yankees,  Columbia Litho print sample     $8.00
1932 Jackie Mitchell, Chattanooga Lookouts female pitcher,  Columbia Litho print sample     $5.00

Sons Of Israel Series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1938 Henry Greenberg Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #1     $8.00
1966 Sanford Koufax Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #2     $10.00
1946 Morris Berg Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #3     $5.00
1953 Albert Rosen Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #4     $5.00
1923 Mose Solomon Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #5     $5.00
1877 Lipman Pike Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #6     $5.00
1948 Lou Boudreau Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #7     $6.00
1935 Buddy Myer Limited Edition Sons Of Israel series #8     $5.00

Legacy Series (200 printed, 3 x 2):
1905 Harry Houdini Limited Edition Legacy series #1     $6.00
1876 General George A. Custer Limited Edition Legacy series #2     $4.00
1919 Emanuel Lasker Limited Edition Legacy series #3     $4.00
1945 General George S. Patton Limited Edition Legacy series #4     $6.00
1842 Sam Houston Limited Edition Legacy series #5     $6.00
1938 Woody Guthrie Limited Edition Legacy series #6     $6.00
1869 General Robert E. Lee Limited Edition Legacy series #7     $10.00
1927 Charles Lindbergh Limited Edition Legacy series #8     $4.00
1970 Timothy Leary Limited Edition Legacy series #9     $4.00

50th Anniversary tribute to the 61 New York Yankees (100 printed 2011, 3.5 x 2.5):
1961 Roger Maris, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #1     $8.00
1961 Mickey Mantle, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #2       $10.00
1961 Yogi Berra, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #3       $5.00
1961 Whitey Ford, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #4       $5.00
1961 Elston Howard & Johnny Blanchard, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #5     $4.00
1961 Ralph Terry & Luis Arroyo, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #6       $3.00
1961 Boyer Kubek & Richardson, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #7       $4.00
1961 Bill Skowron, New York Yankees 50th Anniversary limited edition #8       $3.00

Color TV Series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1955 Color TV #401 Harmon Killebrew, rookie season     $10.00
1955 Color TV #402 Herb Score, rookie season     $5.00
1955 Color TV #403 Sandy Koufax, rookie season     $6.00
1955 Color TV #404 Roberto Clemente, rookie season     $8.00
1955 Color TV #405 Stan Musial, All-Star     $8.00
1955 Color TV #406 Jackie Robinson, All-Star     $6.00
1955 Color TV #407 Duke Snider, All-Star     $8.00
1955 Color TV #408 Ted Williams, All-Star     $10.00
1955 Color TV #409 Billy Evans, umpire $4.00
1955 Color TV #410 Tom Connolly, umpire $4.00
1955 Color TV #411 Runge & McKinley with stripper, umpires $10.00
1955 Color TV #412 Bill Klem, umpire $6.00
1955 Color TV #413 Don Drysdale, Montreal  $6.00
1955 Color TV #414 Frank Robinson, Columbia  $6.00
1955 Color TV #415 Roger Maris, Tulsa  $10.00
1955 Color TV #416 Rocky Colavito, Indianapolis  $6.00

American Pastime Series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1945 Jackie Robinson, Kansas City Monarchs, American Pastime Series #1     $8.00
1927 Babe Ruth, New York Yankees, American Pastime Series #2     $12.00
1954 Hank Aaron, Jacksonville, Sally League, American Pastime Series #3     $10.00
1940 Ted Williams, Boston Red Sox rookie season, American Pastime Series #4     $8.00
1912 Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh Pirates, American Pastime Series #5     $8.00
1906 Doc “Moonlight” Graham, Scranton, American Pastime Series #6     $12.00

Epic Series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1969 Brian Piccolo, Chicago Bears, Epic Series #1     $20.00
1900 Patrick O’Dea, Wisconsin Badgers, Epic Series #2     $4.00
1949 Tom Landry, New York Yankees AAFC, Epic Series #3     $10.00

Elite Series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1955 Ira Hayes, USMC hero of Iwo Jima, Elite Series #1     $15.00
1948 Witold Pilecki, WW2 Polish resistance hero, Elite Series #2     $5.00
1944 Dorie Miller, Pearl Harbor hero, Elite Series #3  $5.00

Super Toys Centennial series (200 printed, 3.5 x 2):
1901 Larry LaJoie, Philadelphia Athletics, Super Toys     $5.00
1909 Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh Pirates, Super Toys     $4.00
1912 Smoky Joe Wood, Boston Red Sox, Super Toys     $4.00
1932 Lefty O’Doul, Brooklyn Robins, Super Toys     $3.00
1946 Rex Barney & Carl Furillo, Dodgers rookies, Super Toys     $3.00
1965 Willie Mays, San Francisco Giants, Super Toys     $5.00
1971 Catfish Hunter, Oakland Athletics, Super Toys     $3.00

Monarch Corona Centennial 1911 reprint series
102 cards total, complete set of 102 valued at $250-300 in Near Mint condition.
(200 printed, 2011  1.5 x 2.75):
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #1 Walter Johnson, Washington Senators      $8.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #2 Ty Cobb, Detroit Tigers        $6.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #3 Nap LaJoie, Cleveland Indians        $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #4 Cy Young, Cleveland Indians       $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #5 Tris Speaker, Boston Red Sox        $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #6 Christy Mathewson, New York Giants        $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #7 Frederick Weed, Seattle, NW League       $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #8 Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh Pirates        $6.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #9 Joe Jackson, New Orleans Pelicans       $10.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #10 Rebel Oakes, Cincinnati Reds       $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #11 Smoky Joe Wood, Boston Red Sox       $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #12 Ten Million, Victoria, NW League      $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #13 Mordecai Brown, Chicago Cubs     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #14 Ginger Beaumont, Chicago Cubs     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #15 Babe Adams, Pittsburgh Pirates     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #16 Johnny Evers, Chicago Cubs     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #17 Lave Cross, Charlotte Hornets     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #18 Hal Chase, New York Highlanders     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #19 Connie Mack, Philadelphia Athletics     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #20 Casey Stengel, Kansas City      $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #21 Jose Mendez, Almendares     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #22 Deacon Phillippe, Pittsburgh     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #23 Slim Sallee, St. Louis Cardinals     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #24 Willie Keeler, New York Giants     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #25 Ray Chapman, Davenport     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #26 Boardwalk Brown, New Britain      $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #27 Bave Bancroft, Superior     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #28 Harry Hooper, Boston Red Sox     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #29 Jack Dunn, Baltimore     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #30 Sam Crawford, Detroit     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #31 Grover Alexander, Syracuse     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #32 Jake Beckley, Hannibal     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #33 Jesse Burkett, Worcester     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #34 Fred Clarke, Pittsburgh     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #35 Jake Daubert, Brooklyn     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #36 Rube Foster, Chicago Giants     $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #37 Rafael Almeda, New Britain     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #38 Chief Bender, Philadelphia Athletics   $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #39 George Burns, Utica     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #40 King Cole, Chicago Cubs     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #41 George Dauss, Detroit     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #42 Clark Griffith, Cincinnati     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #43 Rube Benton, Cincinnati     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #44 Ping Bodie, San Francisco     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #45 Max Carey, Pittsburgh    $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #46 Eddie Collins, Philadelphia Athletics     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #47 Bill Donovan, Detroit     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #48 Billy Hamilton, Lynn, New England League     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #49 Chief Meyers, New York Giants       $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #50 Rube Waddell, Minneapolis     $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #51 Jim Thorpe, Fayetteville     $6.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #52 Ed Walsh, Chicago White Sox     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #53 Mysterious Walker, San Francisco      $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #54 Roger Bresnahan, St. Louis Cardinals     $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #55 Ed Cicotte, Boston Red Sox     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #56 Eddie Collins, Philadelphia Athletics   $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #57 Rube Marquard, New York Giants     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #58 Clyde Milan, Washington Senators    $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #59 Nap Rucker, Brooklyn Dodgers     $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #60 Joe McGinnity, Newark, Eastern League   $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #61 Joe Tinker, Chicago Cubs $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #62 Art Devlin, New York Giants $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #63 Zack Wheat, Briiklyn Dodgers $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #64 Gavvy Cravath, Minneapolis Millers $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #65 Rube Oldring, Philadelphia Athletics $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #66 Frank Baker, Philadelphia Athletics $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #67 Eddie Plank, Philadelphia Athletics $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #68 Stuffy McInnins, Philadelphia Athletics $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #69 Miller Huggins, St Louis Cardinals $4.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #70 Pete Hill, Chicago American Giants $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #71 Hooks Wiltse, New York Giants $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #72 Larry Doyle, New York Giants $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #73 Hippo Vaughn, New York Highlanders  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #74 Stan Covaleski, Lancaster, Tri State League  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #75 Frank Chance, Chicago Cubs  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #76 Jimmy Sheckard, Chicago Cubs  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #77 Buck Weaver, San Francisco, PCL  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #78 Fred Tenney, Boston Braves  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #79 Jeff Tesreau, Shreveport, Texas League  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #80 Heinie Groh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin League  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #81 Pop Lloyd, Chicago Leland Giants, Negro League  $5.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #82 Dummy Taylor, Buffalo Bisons, Eastern League  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #83 Donie Bush, Detroit Tigers  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #84 George Mullin, Detroit Tigers  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #85 Duffy Lewis, Boston Red Sox  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #86 Addie Joss, Cleveland Indians  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #87 Doc White, Chicago White Sox  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #88 Germany Schaefer, Washington Senators  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #89 Dolly Gray, Washington Senators  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #90 Heinie Zimmerman, Chicago Cubs  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #91 Ed Reulbach, Boston Red Sox  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #92 Fred Merkle, New York Giants  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #93 Red Ames, New York Giants  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #94 Dick Rudolph, Toronto, Eastern League  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #95 Dots Miller, Pittsburgh Pirates  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #96 Fred Clarke, Pittsburgh Pirates  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #97 Sherry Magee, Philadelphia Phillies  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #98 Harry Covaleski, Concinnati Reds  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #99 Fred Toney, Winchester, Bluegrass League  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #100 Picus Quinn, New York Highlanders  $3.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #NN FRONT CARD Babe Ruth, St. Marys School  $10.00
1911 Monarch Corona Centennial #NN BACK CARD Gene Krapp, Portland, PCL  $5.00

1912 Centennial reprint set of 9  (2 x 3) :
1912 John McGraw, New York Giants, Centennial   $4.00
1912 Chief Bender, Philadelphia Athletics,  Centennial   $4.00
1912 Frank “Home Run” Baker, Philadelphia Athletics Centennial   $4.00
1912 Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown, Chicago Cubs, Centennial   $4.00
1912 Ty Cobb, Detroit Tigers, Centennial   $4.00
1912 Honus Wagner, Pittsburgh Pirates, Centennial   $4.00
1912 Cy Young, Boston Braves, Centennial   $4.00
1912 Tris Speaker, Boston Red Sox, Centennial   $4.00
1912 “Shoeless” Joe Jackson, Cleveland Indians, Centennial   $4.00

1919 Chicago Black Sox limited edition of 200 – set of 10, (2.25 x 3) printed in 2010:
1919 Joe Jackson, Chicago Black Sox series #1     $10.00
1919 Buck Weaver, Chicago Black Sox series #2     $4.00
1919 Eddie Cicotte, Chicago Black Sox series #3     $4.00
1919 Fred McMullin, Chicago Black Sox series #4     $3.00
1919 Chick Gandil, Chicago Black Sox series #5     $3.00
1919 Lefty Williams, Chicago Black Sox series #6     $3.00
1919 Happy Felsch, Chicago Black Sox series #7     $3.00
1919 Swede Risberg, Chicago Black Sox series #8     $3.00
1919 Team Card, Chicago Black Sox series #9     $5.00
1919 Photo card, Chicago Black Sox not numbered     $2.00

Misc. single cards (200 printed, 3.5 x 2.5):
1877 Al Spalding, Chicago Nationals     $5.00
1894 Mark Twain, Author, Biograph Series #1, mint condition   $3.00
1905 Ty Cobb Augusta minors serial numbered (DP) 400 printed   $10.00
1907 Walter Johnson, Idaho State League minors, Century Series  $5.00
1913 Babe Ruth, catcher St Marys Industrial School Century Series  $10.00
1919 Babe Ruth, Boxer card, serial numbered (DP) 400 printed  $10.00
1935 Luis Tiant Sr., New York Cuban All-Stars, Negro League Century Series  $4.00
1935 Mickey Cochrane, Detroit Tigers     $5.00
1936 Bill Dickey, New York Yankees     $4.00
1938 Ted Williams, Minneapolis Millers     $8.00
1942 Warren Spahn & Johnny Sain Boston Braves  $5.00
1948 Satchel Paige & Larry Doby Cleveland Indians  $6.00
1950 Willie Mays, Trenton Giants minor league Century Series   $6.00
1953 Bobo Holloman, St. Louis Browns     $3.00
1953 Satchel Paige, St Louis Browns Vintage Litho $6.00
1953 Willie Mays, New York Giants Vintage Litho  $6.00
1953 Ted Williams, Boston Red Sox Vintage Litho $8.00
1953 Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers Vintage Litho $8.00
1955 Joe Bauman, Roswell Rockets slugger     $6.00
1955 Jesus Christ, Most Valuable Player retro Color TV baseball card  $3.00
1960 Frank Howard & Jim Gentile Rookie Sluggers LA Dodgers  $4.00
1961 Carl Yastrzemski & Wilbur Wood, Red Sox rookie stars  $6.00
1962 Willie Stargell, Pittburgh Pirates $3.00
1963 Pete Rose & Mel Queen Rookie Stars Cincinnati Reds  $10.00
1963 Stan Musial St Louis Cardinals Vintage Litho   $8.00
1963 Ernie Banks, Chicago Cubs $6.00
1963 Rusty Staub, Houston Colts rookie year   $5.00
1963 Roger Maris, New York Yankees slugger   $6.00
1963 Eddie Mathews Milwaukee Braves  $5.00
1963 Lou Brock, Chicago Cubs rookie year   $4.00
1963 Bo Belinsky, Los Angeles Angels rookie year  $3.00
1963 Curt Flood, St Louis Cardinals $5.00
1963 Duke Snider New York Mets $5.00
1963 Rookie Stars: Lolich McLain Freehan, Detroit Tigers  $5.00
1963 Gil Hodges, New York Mets      $4.00
1963 Harmon Killebrew, Minnesota Twins     $10.00
1963 Mickey Mantle, New York Yankees   $12.00
1963 Robin Roberts, Baltimore Orioles  $3.00
1963 Tony Perez, Macon Peaches  $5.00
1964 Tony Conigliaro & Rico Petrocelli Boston Red Sox Rookies   $5.00
1964 Cassius Clay, World Champion serial numbered, (DP) 400 printed  $10.00
1964 Pete Rose, Cincinnati Reds Century Series  $6.00
1965 Tony Perez & Lee May Cincinnati Reds Rookies  $4.00
1966 Reggie Jackson, Arizona State University Century Series  $5.00
1967 Johnny Bench, catcher Buffalo Bisons – minor league player of the year  $5.00
1968 Carlton Fisk, Waterloo Hawks,Century Series  $4.00
1970 Dock Ellis, Pitches no hitter on LSD     $15.00
1972 Bobby Fischer World Champion serial numbered (DP) 400 printed  $8.00
1974 Rocky Perone, Padres rookie imposter     $3.00

=================================

Monarch Corona continues to release new cards periodically. Cards are produced using vintage offset lithographic techniques and presses, which gives them an authentic vintage appearance.


Superior Card Co.

by card hog


Superior Card Co.

Prices reflect value in Near Mint condition

-

Collector Score **** (4 Stars)

Beautifully illustrated cards on high quality stock, Superior cards were designed by Don Hahn, founder of Superior Postcard Company.  He also distributed his cards as printing and design samples. All are believed to have been produced between 1989-99.  Superior grew into a large company creating postcards for resorts and even entire nations (Belize).  Their postcards are not considered sports cards or limited editions, so they are not listed here.

Complete set of 72 cards  $750.00 – 800.00

 

Superior Legends Of The West

Belle Starr, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $15.00
Billy The Kid, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $20.00
Captain Jack, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
Chief Joseph, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
Cochise, Legends of the West – limited serial numbered edition of 500 cards   $20.00
Doc Holliday, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $15.00
Judge Roy Bean, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
The Sundance Kid, Legends of the West – limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00

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Superior Chiefs 1912
Complete Set 9 cards $60.00

1912 John McGraw – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Chief Bender – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Frank “Home Run” Baker – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Ty Cobb – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1912 Honus Wagner – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1912 Cy Young – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Tris Speaker – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Shoeless Joe Jackson – Superior Chiefs limited edition of 500 cards   $25.00

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Minor Leagues by Superior (2009)

1914 Babe Ruth Providence Grays minor league card 500 printed $15.00
1927 Leo Durocher St. Paul Saints minor league card 500 printed $5.00
1935 Joe DiMaggio San Francisco Seals minor league card 500 printed $10.00
1950 Mickey Mantle Joplin Miners minor league card 500 printed $20.00
1951 Willie Mays, Minneapolis Millers minor league card 500 printed $10.00
1957 Sparky Anderson, Los Angeles Angels minor league card 500 printed $5.00
1959 Willie McCovey Phoenix Giants minor league card 500 printed $5.00
1958 Bob Gibson Rochester Red Wings minor league card 500 printed $10.00
1967 Johnny Bench Buffalo Bisons minor league card 500 printed $5.00
1981 Cal Ripken Jr. Rochester Red Wings minor league card 500 printed $15.00

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Various Singles:

1871 Puppy Stew – Marlborough, limited edition of 500 cards  $5.00
1887 Pete Browning – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1897 Willie Keeler – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1912 Titanic boarding pass, White Star Line – 500 cards  $15.00
1915 George Sisler – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1922 Ken Williams – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1924 Jose Capablanca Chess Champion limited edition of 500 cards $15.00
1926 Rogers Hornsby – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1928 Goose Goslin – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1931 Lefty Grove – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1932 Chicago, City of Champions w/Gabby Harnett – 500 cards   $5.00
1935 Babe Ruth, Final Season Boston Braves – 500 cards  $20.00
1935 Gypsy Rose Lee, Strip Tease Artist – admission ticket – 500 cards  $20.00
1935 Mickey Cochrane – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1936 Bill Dickey – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1937 Hindenburg Airship schedule of sailings, 500 printed  $5.00
1939 Johnny Vander Meer – Superior numbered edition of 500 cards   $15.00
1939 Martin DiHigo – Superior limited edition of 500 cards  $10.00
1942 Ted Williams – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $20.00
1944 Cool Papa Bell – Superior limited edition of 500 cards  $10.00
1946 Ralph Kiner  – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1948 Cleveland AL Team stats card with Satchel Paige – serial numbered 500 cards   $25.00
1951 Mantle & McDougald, Yankees Rookies Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $25.00
1951 Toughie Brasuhn, Roller Derby Star, Brooklyn Red Devils 500 cards  $10.00
1954 Ted Kluszewski – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1955 Clemente & Mejias, Pittsburgh Rookies Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $15.00
1955 Rocky Marciano  – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $25.00
1956 Al Kaline – batting champion, Superior numbered edition of 500 cards   $15.00
1956 Sandy Koufax & Don Drysdale,  Brooklyn, NL – Top Rookies 500 cards   $10.00
1958 Blackie Schwamb prison pitcher, limited edition of 500 cards   $5.00
1957 Milwaukee Team card Eddie Mathews – numbered edition of 500 cards   $20.00
1959 Ernie Banks MVP 500 cards  $10.00
1959 Maris-Bauer trade – Superior numbered edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1959 Winter Dance Party with Buddy Holly – 500 cards   $10.00
1960 Ron Santo & Billy Williams, Cubs Rookies numbered edition of 500 cards   $15.00
1962 George Blanda – Houston Oilers AFL MVP – numbered edition of 500 cards   $20.00
1962 Maury Wills – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1963 Hank Aaron – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $15.00
1963 Pete Rose, Cincinnati, NL – Top Rookie 500 cards   $25.00
1963 Lee Harvey Oswald, world’s greatest marksman 500 cards $10.00
1965 Joan Weston (Blonde Bomber) SF Bay Area Bombers – 500 cards   $10.00
1965 Joe Namath – St. Louis Cardinals NFL Draft Pick – 500 cards  $25.00
1967 Carl Yastrzemski – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1968 Bob Gibson – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00
1969 Tom Seaver – Superior limited edition of 500 cards   $10.00

 

book value

Sporting Life

by card hog


Collector score: *** (2  Stars)

Sporting Life cards should not be confused with the original Sporting Life baseball cards, issued over 100 years ago.  The original Sporting Life cards are very rare, beautifully made litho printed cards.  This may be confusing to novice collectors.

The new Sporting Life cards are created by Jerrold Andrews III of Detroit, Michigan.  Like Helmar Brewing (which is also a Detroit maker of inkjet-printed cards) this company is using an old and venerable name to market their products, which are sold on eBay.  The inkjet-created Sporting Life cards are in no way connected with the original sports magazine or cards, a company which has been out of business for over 80 years.

2012 Sporting Life Jim Thorpe - New York Giants

The company claims that less than two dozen of each card is made.  Recent selling prices range from $5 to over $200 for a single card.  Like all cards created on an inkjet printer, these cards have no value as collectibles.  This is because the inks used to produce them will last only a few years under the best of conditions.  They will not survive long enough to acquire any age-related value.

In fact, as they get older they will begin to fade.  As this becomes more and more noticeable, they will be worth less and less.  This is the exact opposite of a collectible card, which becomes increasingly valuable with age.  These cards are “worth” the most when they are brand new, and the older they become, the less value they will possess, as their condition deteriorates.

It does not matter if pigment inks are used, or archival acid-free stock, or art sprays.  There is no current technology that will enable anything printed on an inkjet printer to survive long enough to become a treasured antique.  Cards printed on a press, using traditional inks (offset-litho) can last essentially forever.  Ink jet creations use water-based inks which are broken down by tiny molecules of moisture in the air, by light, and by ozone.  Even if kept in museum conditions, they will not survive more than a few years.

The cards made by Sporting Life are attractive, and look like a vintage card ought to.  They come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Like Helmar, they are intentionally damaged to make them look old.  It’s a damn shame they won’t ever be as old as they look!

These cards may have some value as folk art or as a conversation piece, but they can not have any value as collectible cards, because they are only temporary.

PRICING: If you own one or more of these cards, and wish to sell it, how much should it go for?  Assuming you’re going to be honest about it, you can’t really sell it as a collectible, because it is new, and because it is only temporary.  So it becomes a modern reproduction, an “objet d’art” if you will.  As with all art, it should be priced based on aesthetics and whatever similar items are selling for.  There are people who buy these cards all the time, apparently knowing exactly what they are getting. In describing the item, I would advise that you avoid two terms:  “rare” and “collectible” because inkjet-created cards are not rare, since they have a print run which is open-ended and can be easily reproduced by anyone.  And, as mentioned above, they will not last long enough to be collectible.